Science at key stage 4 is split into three different learning pathways, Core and Additional Science, Triple Science, BTEC award in Principles of Applied Science and Applications of Science.

Additional Science is study in year eleven and counts as one G.C.S.E in Science in its own right. It covers key ideas and theories from the worlds of Physics, Biology and Chemistry. The year is split into three core topics with each one broken down into smaller sections.

Biology (B2) – This build on your previous knowledge about cells. You will learn how different parts of plants and animals consist of tissues made up of many different types of cell (not all animal cells look like a fried egg!). Also what are the best conditions to grow your tomato plants in? You will learn about all the factors that affect photosynthesis and how this can be used to produce the maximum amount of food for farmers. Finally you will carry out some field work practices, learning how to collect and interpret your findings.

Physics (P2) – The first part of this unit is all about motion, Speed, and the laws of motion. Just how fast can a person fall when they jump out of a plane? Why does it look like they go upwards when they open their parachute in the videos? The second part builds on your knowledge of circuits from key stage 3, studying specific components and how they can be used in every day applications. Finally you will look at Radioactive decay and using radiation to generate electricity.

Chemistry (C2) – How do atoms join together to make compound and giant structure? Well here you will find out, looking at the three main types of bonding and how this can be used to make modern materials used for light weight sports gear and space age materials. You will also investigate what can affect the speed of a chemical reaction and why it is important for the chemical industry to know this.

As well as these three units there is also a Controlled assessment that you will carry out. This forms 25% of your final mark and involves you planning, carrying out and evaluating a practical based on one of the key ideas that you have studied. These are changed by the exam board each year.

G.C.S.E Chemistry consist of three units studied over the course of years 10 and 11.

C1 –Here you will look at the structure of atoms and elements, the structure of the Earth (remember if you cut it in half it looks like a Scotch egg), and how our ideas about these have changed over time (how did we manage to come up with some very wrong and sometimes what seems completely daft ideas about this before?). You will also discover just how important crude oil to us is and begin to wonder just what we are going to do when it runs out!

C2 – How do atoms join together to make compound and giant structure? Well here you will find out, looking at the three main types of bonding and how this can be used to make modern materials used for light weight sports gear and space age materials. You will also investigate what can affect the speed of a chemical reaction and why it is important for the chemical industry to know this.

C3 – Water is quite possibly the most important chemical on the planet, however without treatment it is rarely safe to drink. Here you will learn about all the different things you can find in water, how we can make it safe to drink and just exactly what it is that a water softener does. You will also build on your knowledge of the periodic table and atoms looking at how their structure is linked to where they are in the periodic and how this makes it easier for us to predict their reactions and properties. Finally there is a small section on alcohols, organic chemicals and esters (the smelly chemicals in perfume), which leads onto A level Chemistry should you choose to study chemistry further.

As well as these three units there is also a Controlled assessment that you will carry out. This forms 25% of your final mark and involves you planning, carrying out and evaluating a practical based on one of the key ideas that you have studied. These are changed by the exam board each year.

G.C.S.E Biology consist of three units studied over the course of years 10 and 11.

B1 – This unit includes the human body and how it maintains its internal condition using hormones, how its fights infections and how we can control human fertility building on what you have learnt in year 8. You will also be looking at plant adaptions, controlling plants growth and discussing the moral issues around genetic engineering and cloning. Should you be able to select the colour of your baby’s eyes or create a copy of yourself?

B2 – This build on your previous knowledge about cells. You will learn how different parts of plants and animals consist of tissues made up of many different types of cell (not all animal cells look like a fried egg!). Also what is the best condition to grow your tomato plants in? You will learn about all the factors that affect photosynthesis and how this can be used to produce the maximum amount of food for farmers. Finally you will carry out some field work practices, learning how to collect and interpret your findings.

B3 – Firstly you will study how substances move in and out of cells, the heart and the circulatory system and how your body controls the amount of water and glucose in the blood. Secondly you will be looking at the impact humans are having on the Earth and its environment, how we can reduce this and just why it is so important that we start using less in the way of resources and energy.

As well as these three units there is also a Controlled assessment that you will carry out. This forms 25% of your final mark and involves you planning, carrying out and evaluating a practical based on one of the key ideas that you have studied. These are changed by the exam board each year.

G.C.S.E Physics consist of three units studied over the course of years 10 and 11.

P1 – At key stage 3 you looked out how heat energy can move. Here you will build on these ideas and look at what happens to matter when you give it more energy. There is also the issue of generating and paying for electricity (why you are always told to stop leaving your mobile phone charger switched on at the plug by your parents) and just how are we going to generate our electricity when the fossil fuels run out?

P2 – The first part of this unit is all about motion, speed, and the laws of motion. Just how fast can a person fall when they jump out of a plane? Why does it look like that you go upwards when they open their parachute in the videos? The second part builds on your knowledge of circuits from key stage 3, studying specific components and how they can be used in every day applications. Finally you will look at Radioactive decay and using radiation to generate electricity.

P3 – In this unit you build on your knowledge of waves and the uses of certain parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. How do x-rays, ultrasound devices in hospitals work? You will also be looking at optical lenses and how the human eye compares to cameras. There is a small section of pressure in liquids and hydraulics that build on your work in year 9 and then finally you will also investigate the motor effect and the use of transformers (electrical not robots in disguise).

As well as these three units there is also a Controlled assessment that you will carry out. This forms 25% of your final mark and involves you planning, carrying out and evaluating a practical based on one of the key ideas that you have studied. These are changed by the exam board each year. 

Rushden Academy

Rushden Academy

01933 350391

info@rushden-academy.net

KS3 Head of Years

Head of year 7 - Mrs J Tudor

Head of year 8 (KS3 Lead)  -Miss A Gurnham

Head of year 9 - Miss R Burrows

KS4 Head of Years

Head of year 10 - Miss J Neville

Head of year 11 (KS4 Lead) - Miss S Carroll

KS5 Head of Year

Head of year 12 & 13 - Mr P Chapman

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Rushden Academy

Hayway, Rushden, Northamptonshire. NN10 6AG
Tel: 01933 350391
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